Thursday, November 30, 2006

This is the place for your questions and comments

Welcome to the Carpetguru's question and answer forum. I used to try and answer questions by email, but the volume of email has increased to the point to where I was answering many of the same questions. By using this forum, I hope to answer your questions as well as creating a sense of community. Here you can ask the guru any questions concerning carpet, carpet pad, vinyl flooring, laminate flooring, and hardwoods.

Also, if you have an installation question or problems I will discuss it with you here for all to see. To Reach the latest comment click on the comment link below, and then when the screen changes, click on the newest. If you are having trouble reading this blog you can leave a comment at www.facebook.com/carpetguru.CarpetClassics

Thank You,
Jim

2,568 comments :

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Anonymous said...

This will a great service for those who want help in picking out the right carpet.

Anonymous said...

So what is your opinion about Smart Strand

Dave

Anonymous said...

Dave,

My opinion about Smart Strand is stated on www.carpetguru.com/carpnews.html

Good Luck,

Jim
DBA Careptguru.com

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
shane said...

great site!

I've learned so many things about carpet padding. Thank you.

How to Post: said...

Thank you for your Kind words, Shane.

Curious Customer said...

I have heard that the Carpet Guru's Installers are some of the best in the industry. How do you find these exceptional contractors and what are their qualifications?

Carpetguru said...

The craftsmen who work for me have been with me a very long time. The longest being 27 years, and the least amount of service has been 15 years.

During the early years at Carpet Classics, I hired and fired several crews for lack of ability, lack of customer concern, abuse of chemicals, etc. I finally found an installer who had worked for his father's carpet shop. This man was in his 20's at the time , but had been installed carpet since he was 15. I discovered that this is the type of craftsman I wanted to represent Carpet Classics (my store in Tigard Oregon), and thus I decided to pay him well, treat him as an equal, and in general form a partnership with him. After 27 years, his son is now working with him, and he is becoming an outstanding craftsman in his own right.

I was lucky, but also, I understoond what it took to install carpet, as I had done so working partime during my five year college education.

Thus, finding good installers is not just as easy as looking in the phonebook. It takes time and knowledge, and trail and error, to find qualified people. Once you find a real craftsman, you try and pay him what he is worth. This is why our labor prices are a little more, but if your are going to by "mercedes" carpet, you don't what a "yugo" mechanic.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

How hard is it to get on at Royalty Carpets. I would be transferring from Masland Carpets in Alabama. I cannot get in contact with them.

Carpetguru said...

If you have been "in the business", I would suggest you attend Surfaces 2007 in Vegas this
Feb. 7-10th and visit their "booth". Also, it would be a good opportunity to meet other potential employment at other mills.

Royalty is one of the few remaining family owned carpet mills. It is not part of the dixie group, Beaulieu, Mohawk, Shaw or Gulistan.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Do I need a moisture barrier or pad under indoor/outdoor carpet installed over my basement floor (concrete). Thanks
Terry

Carpetguru said...

Terry,

You can install the indoor/outdoor carpet using a direct glue down method. This is how many commercial installations are done. I am assuming the carpet is a level loop in a short dense pile.

The key in this case is to make sure the floor is dry and clean. Also, small cracks in the floor should be filled with a patching compound.

Hope this helps,

Jim

Anonymous said...

Very informative site.

I am so glad you have given credit to the "installers".
They can make or break any carpet retailer.
I have been in the Manufacturing end of this industry for over 15 years and currently have been in claims dept of one of the big 3 for over 5 years.
It's sad to see so many claims that could have been avoided if the installers had been honest in noticing a defect before they ripped out a consumers old carpet, installed the new carpet with an obvious defect so they could get paid. Thus leaving the homeowner with a problem that should have been seen before it left the mill.

I have 10 years behind me running the finishing or coater ovens and all other aspects of shearing and final inspection processes.

Most of the goods produced today run about 60 to 150 feet a minute thru this process which make inspecting these goods for defects a challange even with 2 or more inspectors monitoring the carpet quality just before it is rolled up and "tagged and bagged".

My advise to anyone who is buying new carpet is to ask:
1: Are your installers certified thru the IICRC or FCITRC programs.
these standards for certifacation
insure your installer has been trained in the proper installation methods required to meet industry standards. IE all of our residential carpet MUST be powerstretched to a SECURE tackstrip to be under warranty.

2. Your carpet must be properly maintained.
Most carpet warranties require the carpet to be cleaned by a LICENSED carpet care professional every 12-24 months and you must save the reciepts for this service to show the carpet has been properly maintained.
!!! many many many people are unaware of this policy that is underwritten by all carpet manufacturers.!!
This is considered a maintance issue somewhat like having to change the oil in your car.
If the carpet is allowed to build up soil and residue that CANNOT BE EXTRACTED BY NORMAL VACUUMING, this material will act like sandpaper to most of todays nylon and polyproplene and most certainly OLEFIN fibers.
YOU MUST HAVE YOUR CARPET CLEANED EVERY 12 to 24 months to keep your warranty active!

Many of our carpets have 15 year wear warranties that will become inactive after 24 months if you do not have the carpet cleaned and have the reciepts to show this service has been performed!!!!!

Do you know how olefin carpet fibers are made?
Olefin is a very economical and environmently sound choice of carpet if you don't mind carpet that will exhibit matting and crushing in the main traffic areas.
This fiber is made from melting, bleaching and recoloring the plastic soda and water bottles we all use every day. Once this fiber has been bent, crushed or otherwise used under normal wear, it WILL NOT respond to steam cleaning to restore the original shape of the yarn bundle. IT IS PLASTIC!!!



3: ALLWAYS be home when the carpet is being installed!
Sometimes at the distribution center a roll of carpet will be inadevertanly mislabeled or the wrong roll pulled from stock for *CUT ORDER*.......
The installer has no idea if you ordered purple colored carpet instead of a beige or cream or whatever.
Our invoices state once the carpet has been received it is YOURS!
If you make cut without checking it out we are NOT responsible.
Of cousrse we make exceptions to this everyday but this is for customer relations and we can deny without any liablity to our company unless the carpet is refused and returned at time of delivery...........whew and I'm just getting started.

4: This probably the MOST IMPORTANT !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
IF YOU SEE A PROBLEM REPORT IT AT ONCE! Do Not Delay!
Most carpet manufacturers have a 1 year warranty on manufacturing defects! This means if your carpet starts have any type of problem such as backing separation, wrinkles, any visable defects or any concerns of your carpet not being as the dealers sample is, call the retailer where you purchsed the material from asap and request they file a claim with the the mill they bought the carpet from.
If they are unwilling to help you or have gone out of business please call the manufactuer to setup a claim. The longer you wait the less likely we will honor the claim.

5. STAINS
Most all carpet sold today with rhe execption of commerial grade carpet has some kind of stain warranty.

KNOW THESE RULES!
A stainmaster warrantied carpet must be filed thru the "stainmaster dupont company" as they carry all the warranties on the fiber they produce for us to manufacture the material.
This may seem like cop out on our part but stainmaster has sold us this yarn with this warranty stating they are liable for stain defects. ** this warranty most often only covers food and beverage stains only.

If you are looking for a real high perfomance carpet that certifed stain resitant to ANY and ALL stains, please consider the Beaulieu line of HOLLYTEX ULTIMATE PERFORMACE Solution Dyed Nylon series.
THis line of products carries a warranty that will replace the affected area that is stained. no matter what the stain as long as the homeowner has had the carpet pro-cleaned and has the receipts to show this service has been done.
Beaulieu will replace this carpet but will not pay any labor charges invovled with this replacement.

I have personally taken swatches of this material and soaked them in a 100% bleach solution for 48 hours and have seen no color or texture retention results.

The very few claims I have seen that will not respond to enzyme treatment have been animal vomit stains that were not treated immediatly and have been left to set for a week or more.
But we have honored and credited all of these claims based on the warranty.

I honestly believe the line to be the best warrantied and quality line of carpet available at this time.

soso

Carpetguru said...

soso,

Wow what a lot of info. You are correct when you speak about the importance of quality of installation, and the need for keeping the carpet clean. Yes , do keep recoords of every part of the sale and maintenance of your carpet.

One should note that most of the plastic from pop bottles is used in making PET polyester fiber. Oefin is also a type of plastic, but is still a petroleum based fiber. Yes, olefin will show crushing if the carpet is not constructed in a dense
short pile.

Interesting that you should mention solution dyed nylons from Hollytex. We have been featuring these carpets for a couple of years now, and every customer who has had this carpet installed is thrilled with its performance. I just hope other dealers don't figure out just how good these carpets are, as I enjoy being the only one on the block selling this carpet in my neighborhood.

Thanks for you info,

Jim

peebs said...

First let me say I really like your site. You have a lot of great information!

I have been in the carpet cleaning, dyeing and restoration business since I was fourteen and have owned my own restoration company specializing in commercial property for a decade now. Over the years I have had several requests to start installing carpet. I have most all the tools as I do repair seams, transition strips, and restretch carpet after water/ sewer/ fire restorations for these same clients. I have been renting or using a friends power stretcher for a while and am ready to buy my own. What do your installers use? I am looking at getting the Crain 520, what are your thoughts vs. the 500? I have never used the 520 (it has the 60 degree swivel head).

Also, as far as purchasing in the Minneapolis area, what are your thoughts on purchasing from Wholesale Carpets and Flooring (Nationwide Chain) vs. a good local store? I buy my pad from Hank's Specialties and am confident they are the best and most reputable for installation tools and padding/ underlayment. I would be buying mostly for Section 8 and lower rent properties. I am interested in a good price/ durability. Inevitably the carpets will go 6 months or more without much of a vacuum.

This industry is difficult to learn on your own, fortunately I have friends who install for a living and have learned a fair amount from them. It never fails though, when I need some info they can be extremely hard to get a hold of. Are random installation questions something you would respond to?

What are your thoughts on the IICRC vs. FCITRC? I will eventually take a course in installation. For now though I don't have the time or need to. I don't belong even as a carpet cleaner, as I keep up on the industry myself, and don't have the need to keep paying yearly fees to belong to a group slow to advance their thinking and processes. Is their a certification that doesn't require a yearly fee?

Sincerely,
Matt Peebles
Owner
Certified Color Technologies, Inc.
Shorewood, MN

Carpetguru said...

Matt,

Although I normally like to keep this forum for consumer questions, I will answer some of yours. I do professional consulting work, but I will help you with an install question from time to time.

As for power stretcher, I like Roberts senior for commercial work, and junior for residential. The Crain line is good, and I would pay the extra for the swivel head.

In you case, since your are looking for price, I'd stick with Wholesale Carpets and Flooring. Eventually, you will need a distributor or mill supplier.

Soon all Shaw carpets will have to be cleaned by an IICRC certified carpet cleaner in order for the consumer to keep their warranty in place. This is to take effect with carpets sold after January 1, 2007. Thus, join the IICRC and keep up with the training.

Good luck,

Jim

peebs said...

Thanks for your input. You do a great consumer service here on the web.

-Matt

peebs said...

Jim,

What are your thoughts on the Bluebook Cost Guide for Cleaning, Reconstruction and Repair as a general guideline for pricing/ estimating in this industry? Is there another reference for pricing I should also consult? Also, what do you think the best/ most recognized certification program is for an installer?

Thanks,
Matt

Carpetguru said...

Matt,

I like the work that Jim Walker has been doing.


Good luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Jim,
What do you think about using a synthetic jute pad over radiant heat floors? I know you said froth foam is best but synthetic jute is more readliy available to me.
Thanks,
Jennifer Bragdon
Nantucket, Ma.

Carpetguru said...

Jennifer,

Jute is a plant fiber, and I guess anything else would be synthetic.

I suggest a spun nylon fiber pad with a weight of 32 ounces. This will be best; especially if you are installing anything that looks like commercial carpet.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

I'm trying to find out if Resista (supposedly)a "Shaw" product is comparable to "SmartStrand"? I like the thickness (density) of the Resista La Pointe but not sure how it will stand up to Mohawk's Vibrant Beauty with SmartStrand. Mohawk has the denser variety in SmartStrand but not the color I'm looking for...however, the Resista La Pointe has the exact color that matches the one I like in Mohawk's Vibrant Beauty. Also, the store that carries the Mohawk Vibrant Beauty is suggesting the Dupont 8lb. pet pad. Any help or insight would be very much appreciated!

Thank you,
Renee Datz

Carpetguru said...

Renee,
The products are too close to call
as far as which is "best". If you like the color, go for it. The 8lb pad is a good idea, but you do not have to spend extra for a "pet" pad. This is just a gimmick.

Good luck,

Jim

Anonymous said...

What grade or quality would a stainmaster shaw, xtralifeBCF nylon/queen 32 face wt, .500 thickness, 65.3 total wt, 2304 density fall into for a home?

Carpetguru said...

This is a seven to ten year carpet.

Good Luck,

Jim

Anonymous said...

Hi CarpetGuru. I am tasked with carpeting a student dorm of 25,000 square feet. Lots of wear and tear. We got a quote from vendor A for 30 ounce carpet, and then a second quote at nearly half the cost of 22 ounce carpet from vendor B.

Vendor A tells us 22 ounce carpet won't last more than 3 years. What do you think about this?

Thanks.

Carpetguru said...

I would need to know the exact specs in order to
give you any advice. Things like gauge, fiber content and type, method of installation etc.

Once I have this information I will make a general statement about which would be better.

Remember, in carpeting, as in life, you get what you pay for.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

We installed Carpet One _ Lee's brand 5-1/2 years ago (carpet was made by Shaw). The carpet failed in a non traffic area. The inspector noted the sun light broke down the latex and deteriorated the face yarn completely. We live in Western Oregon. Carpet One advised this is not covered and we are responsible for keeping our blinds closed.

The dealer said there is nothing he can do.

Is this normal for carpet to fail like this?

I don't see where they disclaim this and have never heard of such a problem.

Thanks
Tim

Carpetguru said...

Tim,

I am sorry to learn of your problems with your "Carpet One" carpet. One would think that a franchise that prides itself on selling warranties would be of more help.

Shaw, on the other hand, has some strict policies that must be followed in order to keep your warranty in play. First, you must have your carpet cleaned by a professional every two years. You must also keep the receipt to show proof. The cleaning method must be hot water extraction (steam). After two years, most Shaw warranties are
pro-rated ; much like a tire warranty.

BTW, if your carpet was inspected by a person being paid by Shaw, I may think about getting your own. However, after five years , you are not going to have much a warranty left.

You may want to read my comments at www.carpetguru.com/warranty.html

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

How much has carpet risen in price in that last year?

Carpetguru said...

Carpet prices have increased about eight percent.
Labor prices have increased for those firms wishing to keep their quality installers. Freight has increased about six percent. Finally, the price of pad has doubled. Pad increases are due in part to loss of furniture manufacturers in the south.

Jim

Anonymous said...

To the Carpet Guru

Thanks you for such an informative site. I do have a question. I live in an old 3-story Victorian flat the person below us snores incredibly loud. Is there a sound proofing rating for padding and carpet? We need are looking for a pad that can effectively muffle the sound from below. Do you have any suggestions or solutions?

Thank you so much

Dave

Carpetguru said...

Dave,

I am not sure about a rating for sound proofing for residential padding.

The carpet has more to do with muffeling the sound than the pad. I would suggest a thick plush of at least 65 ounces of fiber, installed over 120 ounce slab rubber. This will keep the soring to a murmur.

Next step will the use of ear plugs.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

thanks for your column. I have a water problem in my baseent - floods every few years or so. Nor up to your ankles or enything but squsihy carpet. My present carept is 22 years old and has been amazingly durable in the circumstance (I have it professionally dried and cleaned when it is wet.) It is now beyound redemption and my insurers tell me don't use carpet there because they all use a latex bond which is water soluble and any new carpet will de-lamionate. Any suggestions other than a non-carept surface?

Carpetguru said...

It is amazing that your old carpet survived the water as long as it did.

I would check into finding a retailer who does commercial carpet work. Ask to see commcercial carpet tile. Most of these have a vinyl back. Water will not cause the back to delaminate. You can still have your carpet cleaner dry out these tile just
like your old carpet.

Good luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Thank you so much for this information! I hope to buy a home soon and your expertise is invaluable!

Dawn:)

Carpetguru said...

Thank you for your kind words, Dawn.


Good luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Dave- I'm looking into purchasing a house, but, the prevoius owners went hog wild with indoor outdoor carpet- all glued down..any suggestions on removal?
Thankls, Susan

Carpetguru said...

Susan,

If the carpet is glued down and the backing was NOT rubber, then one can scrape up the old with a square nosed shovel or professional scraping tool.

It the carpet has a rubber backing, the top layer of the carpet may be removed leaving the rubber layed glued down to the floor. You can lay new pad and carpet over this thin layer of old rubber.

Hint, take a heavy duty box cutter, and cut down through the top of the carpet to the floor in rows every six inches. Then begin to peel up a small corner until you have the start of a six inch strip. Carefully roll this strip into a roll. This should make either type of removal much less of a chore.

Good Luck,

Jim

Patti in Texas said...

We are having difficulty getting some straight answers from our retailer. Our Shaw carpeting is "de-laming" and has to be replaced. The retailer is saying they will "credit" us $13.95 per sq. yard for our carpet (Shaw Sutton Plantisphere - 15 ft. width). This sounds like wholesale price to me. We originally paid $6,486 for 209 square yards of the carpet. This included installation, and 3/8" , 8 lb. pad w/moisture barrier. Since our invoice doesn't itemize the cost of each, but only shows a total amount, we don't really have a set dollar figure for the cost per sq. yard. What should we do?

Carpetguru said...

Patti,

You probably paid close to $19/sq yd for the carpet alone. If your carpet is over two years old, Shaw's replacement policy is to credit on a sliding scale. 80% after two years, 70% after three years etc. If your carpet is under two years old, the carpet should be replaced at no exspense to you, including labor to reinstall the new. You may have to move furniture, or pay extra for that service.

BTW, Shaw will only honor this warranty if you can prove you have had the carpet cleaned by a professional, and you have the receipt. This applies to carpets two years or older.

I hope this helps, and Good luck in your claim.

Jim

sissie said...

Hello, i am a sales rep for a flooring retail store and came acrossed an article about Resista carpet, with awesome warranties so ive been researching what its made of so i can do a comparison to mohawk products which i prefer the Smart Strand products. First off is the Resista line a petroleum based product and what is the differences that make it so much better than the Smart Strand? Im partial to the corn based products, while we have shaw products in our store, i still push mohawks products because of the excellent warranties and easy dealings with mohawk should my customers have any problems...

Carpetguru said...

Sissie,

Its great that you give your customers choices, however, make sure that you complete your interview before showing any particular type of fiber, stian treatment, etc.

There is no superior stain treatment. Most of what you read is from the marketing division of the firms involved, i.e. Carpet One, Mohawk etc. Resista is a PET polyester with Carpet One's brand of stain treatment. SmartStand however, is a PPT fiber, and also has Mohawk's brand of stain treatment. The performance of these carpets will be based on the construction of each, rather than the stain treatment each may have.

Beware of over selling warranties. Check out our warranty site at www.carpetguru.com/warranty.html

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

I am going to purchase low pile berber carpet. The "premium pad" that is available to purchase with it is called odor-eater. they offer it 7/16 and 9lb density. I can't seem to find useful information on odor-eater carpet padding. I was wondering what type of padding is it?

Carpetguru said...

Odor Eater pad works best when combined with a
carpet that also has the "odor eater" chemical treatment.

If you want a real "premium pad", use a good 120 ounce slab rubber pad. If you are going to live in the house less then ten years, then a 7/16th 8lb rebond will work fine.

Good Luck,
jim

Anonymous said...

I purchased a 64 oz carpet thirty years ago that I was told was nylon. I certainly paid for nylon. The carpet has worn well and has only a minimal traffic pattern in the hall.

I recently had an insurance claim and the "lab" for the carrier says it is not nylon but polyester. I've done the burn test and compared it to Nylon and polyester and it sure seems to be nylon to me. Do you have any access to "history" of plush carpet from polyester; my memory is that only nylon or wool was used in dense plush back in mid 70's. Alternatively do you know of an independent lab I can send a sample to. They are allowing 50% of what it would be if I can prove it is nylon. jw

Carpetguru said...

JW,

There is a 99 percent chance that your "lab" was mistaken. The polyesters used in carpets until 1974 were made from "Kodel" polyester fiber. This first generation of polyester is what gave the name polyester a bad name. The carpets made from Kodel at that time where mostly loose plushes and shags. The fiber was full of air, and not twisted. Thus, those carpets crushed quickly. There is NO way that your carpet would have lasted 30 years if it was made of polyester.

I would check your policy and see if you have "equal replacement" insurance. if that is the case, your insurance company should be offering $38/sq yd installed without pad as a minimum offer. If the pad was also damaged, add $4/sq yd.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

I just wanted to say THANK YOU for this website. I'm currently shopping for carpet in the Atlanta, GA area, and the information contained on your site will save me money and time. Thanks again.

Glenda

Carpetguru said...

Thank you for your kind words, Glenda.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

What kind of carpet and pad do you recommend for a finished basement that will be used as a recreational play area (ie: lots of running around,tumbling, etc.)? Being that it is in the basement means it is on a cement slab. We were going to go with a berber carpet and I came across your website while looking into padding. I would appreciate your comments. Thank you.

Carpetguru said...

You berber selection will work great; especially if the fiber content is nylon.

Install over a 120 ounce slab rubber pad, or a froth foam pad from Healthier Choice. I would suggest the "blue" version of this pad that is 5/16th inch thick. You will have to look around a little to find froth foam pad. There is a number at the bottom of the page at www.carpetguru.com/froth.html. Tell them the carpetguru sent you and they will give you the name of a dealer in your hometown. If you live the the Portland metro area, I am that dealer.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Carpet Guru,

I like your site. I have a question. I have wall to wall carpeting in my basement. I think it is a berber carpet. I have some big area rugs that I would like to use on top. However, I have been told that you should not lay are rug over a carpet because you can damage the lower carpet. Is this true? Is there any special pad I can use? I have one of those waffle rubber pads. There would not be that much "traffic" on the rug.

Carpetguru said...

You may use your area rugs if the backing of these rugs are not plastic.

You may have to put up with a little movement in the area rugs because your berber is installed over a waffle pad. This type of pad is softer than normal berber pad, and will allow for more flex.

Hope this helps,

Jim

Anonymous said...

Terrific site. If it is any indication of how you conduct business, you are a very successful person. My only regret is that I do not live in the Portland metro area.

Anonymous said...

I have one clarification/follow up question about the rug on carpet. I was thinking about using the waffle pad between (sandwiched) the rug and carpet. I was thinking that this would soften any kind of rubbing that might occur. Is this a good idea, or just put the rug right on top. The backing of the rug is not plastic.

Carpetguru said...

It would be unwise to place a waffle rubber type pad between your area rug and existing wall to wall carpet. First, the chemicals in the pad will, after a time, stain the surface of the wall to wall carpet. Second, the pad will be too soft, and the rug will not stay in place. Finally, the waffle pad will "break down" and the tiny piece of clay and pad will harm the fiber of the wall to wall carpet.

They do make a product call "the solution" that will hold your rug in place, and will not harm the carpet underneath. It is made by foam products inc, and is available in six foot widths at $7.95 per running foot.

The effect of placing a rug onto to your wall to wall carpet is always going to require that you clean the wall to wall carpet using a professional steam cleaner before you try and sell your home.

Good Luck
Jim

Anonymous said...

I'm considering getting into the carpet and flooring business. Do you see more smaller retail shops going OUT of business or more thriving? Would greatly appreciate any feedback.

Carpetguru said...

You must have experience and money to open a new dealership. The big box stores are snuffing out the small dealer. Only those dealers who provide what the big box stores can't (service), will survive.

If you worked for a larger dealer to gain some experience, perhaps you have what it takes to be a successful floorcovering store in twenty first century.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

A construction contractor had carpet and pad installed in my home after a minor flood. The pad sqeeks like a second story wood floor. I pointed the problem out to the contractor and they said they replaced the noisy spots. There are still squeeky spots. The pad is rebond and the queeks are cause by one of the ingredients. I think the product is of inferior quality. Should I request the pad be replaced?

Carpetguru said...

You pad is squeaking because it contains too many "skins" in the mix. A skin is like the crust on a loaf of bread. In making rebond, the crusts are cut off and reground so as to become part of the pad mix. If there are too many big pieces of "crust", then they often end up touching the floor at just the right angle so as to make a sqeaking sound when stepped on. This is a pad defect.
You should ask the pad supplier and the dealer to replace your pad.

Good Luck,
Jim aka carpetguru

Jane said...

I recently purchased an oriental area rug to be used over a carpeted eating area. I just moved into an apartment and even though the carpet is not the best quality, I don't want to get anything on it. The area rug will not lay flat, it seems to buckle up. Is there something I should be putting underneath it? Thank you very much.

Carpetguru said...

The padding under the wall to wall carpet is soft, and thus when you place an area rug over the top of your wall to wall carpet it will creep.

To help keep your area rug in place try find a product called "the solution" from Foam Products Co in Dalton GA. The thin pad has kleats on one side and non-skid rubber on the other. The keats go on the wall to wall carpet. This pad is made
six foot wide and is about $8/per running fooot. It is difficult to find.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Hi - Can you please help? I am purchasing carpet for my Living room/Dining room. I've tried to shop around and do some research and I went into this expecting to purchase a 100% Nylon Tactesse carpet for its durability. However, I have since realized that I prefer a shaggier frieze in a two tone color and have been unable to find this combination in the right color in a Nylon. I have found it in a 100% BCF PET Polyester. The warranties seem to be comparable...would I be OK with this with 2 young children and a fairly high traffic area? Please advise.
Thank you, Remi

Carpetguru said...

If you look at some of the Tuft-Tex line of carpet from Shaw, you will find many Tactesse two tone
shags . However, if you want multi colored nylon, check out a product callled "Herb Garden" from Beaulieu Carpet Mills.

However, a Bulk Continuous Filament PET carpet that is well constructed (tightly twisted) will work very well in your living room and dining room.

To keep your warranties remember to have your new carpet professionally cleaned after two years.

Good Luck,
Jim

Richard said...

I'm replacing carpeting in my house due to a fire and I'm not sure which way to go and what manufacturer or vendor to go with. I had a Lee's nylon berber previously. The insurance company pointed me to a vendor that carries Mohawk Smart strand which I'm told it's is comparable to Lee's, but the warranty isn't as long on Mohawk as it is Lee's, and adding further confusion is the fact that Lee's is made exclusively for Carpet One franchises. How due I determine what mill makes the Lee brand so I can due further research and not just rely on what the sales people tell me. Being a consumer I find it hard on which type of carpet to use. Is the Mohawk as good as the Lee's brand?

Regards,
Richard

Carpetguru said...

Richard,

You need to read all of carpetguru.com. After you have done so you will know that it is construction, not fiber that determines the performance.

If you can take a small sample of your old carpet to your local carpet dealer, he will try and show you a carpet of equal value.

The "lees" carpet you purchased is not made by lees, and had inflated warranties. Your local dealer will have carpets that will last a long time. If you are going to be in the home for ten years or more, ask your dealer to show you a solution dyed nylon fireze. This is about as good a carpet as
you can buy for stain resistence and for wear. Smartstrand , if equally constructed will perform almost as well.

Good luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Dear Carpet Guru:

I hope you can help me. I'm a renter and will be moving soon. My landlord has required that I clean the carpets before I leave. When I moved in, there is what appeared to be a motor oil type stain on the carpet that I haven't been able to get out. The carpet is the cheapest you could probably buy: extremely tough, short carpet that appears to belong in a mechanic's shop or something. Also, there is little red wax droppings in some locations. Can you give me any advice as to how to clean these spots in the least expensive way possible? I really appreciate it.

Renee

Carpetguru said...

Renee,

I hope you pointed out the oil stain to your landlord before you moved in. You will not be able to get that stain out of your cheap olefin commercial type carpet. Any attempt at cleaning will only make the stain go away for a week or so.

The red wax spots can be removed by placing a plain paper towel over the spot and setting a WARM iron over the paper towel. The wax will melt and wick into the paper towel. Use EXTREME caution no to set the iron temperature too hot. You will melt the carpet. I think delicate setting on most irons will work.

Good Luck,

Jim

Anonymous said...

Wow, great information! And then I found you were local and I feel doubly lucky.

My question is this: How can you tell if a berber is puffed up because air has been added? We're looking at Mohawks Color Extravaganza line and want something that will really last without getting matted down. I thought berber was it until I started reading more...

Any info will be greatly appreciated and we might be making a trip to see you when this snow passes! :)
Thanks,
Jill

Carpetguru said...

Thank you for your kind words, Jill.
You can tell if a carept is "full of air" by looking at the twist level of the fiber. In a quality berber, each loop is made from at least two strands of fiber that have been twisted together and then made in to a loop. Also, look for nylon when possible .

I would love for you to visit me at our Tigard location. I will be in the store on Wed starting at noon, and will probably close early ; around 4 pm. Thursday will be a normal 10 to 5 day.

Looking forward to your visit,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Thank you CarpetGuru! Maybe I will scrub the oil stain really good right before I check out, and then it will magically reappear for the next tenant! Thanks again for your advice, love your site...

Renee

Carpetguru said...

Good Luck,
Jim

Dennis Fellingham said...

Powdery nylon carpet. I live in coastal subtropical Queensland - Australia and my 4 year old nylon carpet has gone powdery in 2 of 4 rooms.These rooms do not have direct sunlight coming into them, but they are very bright and hot - we also have fairly high humidity here.The other 2 rooms seem OK, they are on a shady sides of the house.
What can be causing the problem and what type of carpet should I replace it with ?
Hope you can help.
Regards - Dennis

Carpetguru said...

Dennis,

If "powdery" is Astrailian for faded or bleached out, then maybe I can answer your question. Sunlight and other factors will cause ordinary nylon carpets to fade over time.

In the future you could purchase a solution dyed nylon to avoid any change of color over the years. Also, PET and PTT (SmartStrand by Mohawk) polyester are more colorfast than most nylons. Thus, if you are living in a sunny climate, try and use one of the above.

If on the other hand, "powdery" means something else, please write me again with more adjectives.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

I have just read your entire site. Wow, what a help. Now I have a different question for you! Which would be better for a basement with teenagers: The Mohawk 100% Nylon I spoke of earlier (it is the best color for us) or a Shaw (Solution Dyed, I believe) Softbac 100% nylon tactesse?
Also, on a basement concrete floor, should I expect the installers to NAIL or GLUE the tacking strip down? Should I insist they nail it? THANKS!!! I look forward to reading your response. I wish I lived in Oregon!!! Diane

Carpetguru said...

Diane,

I just published you second comment, as I can answer both here.
First of all, any looped carpet should have a firm pad underneath. An 8 lb rebond will work as long as it is not thicker than 7/16th inch. A 23 lb slab rubber would be better, but only if you are going to stay in your home over 10 years for sure.

The two carpets you mention are both good carpets. If your room received a great deal of sun, then the solution dyed nylon would be a little better because it will not fade. However, if the color of the Mohawk works, and the carpet is well constructed, then go with it.
When carpet is installed over concrete the decision to nail or glue the tack strip down is at the choice of the professional installer. Some concrete is to old and hard that is requires the tack strip to be glued. Remember when installing over concrete, a power stretcher with tubes is a must.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

I am replacing the carpetting in the 4 bedrooms in our home. I also plan on installing the same carpet on the stairs that lead the second floor. I am looking at (what I am told) is a new carpet product from Dupont made of a fiber called "polymer". Do you have any insight into this product ?

Carpetguru said...

The carpet you are looking at is most likey a Mohawk Carpet made from their branded fiber called SmartStrand. This fiber is made from a Dupont Polymer that is part of the Polyester family, and has a long chemical name that has been shortened to just PTT. Unlike PET polyester, this fiber is supposed to have better wearability, and superior fade resistence.

This carpet may just be dandy for your needs if it is constructed well. Since this fiber has not been on the market a long time, I do not know with certainty how it will perform. If you are willing to take a chance, go for iit.

I still like nylon as my fiber of choice if the construction of the carpet is not "bullet proof".

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

What is your opinion of Masland carpet?
If I put a masland carpet on hardwood floor that will have a dining room table and chairs on it, but not much traffic, would I use the fiber or slab rubber?

Anonymous said...

Hi Guru,

Thanks for the wealth of info.

I am considering placing carpet in our basement. Presentky there is a glued down indoor/outdoor on top os some cork floor that has been glued to the concrete floor. No water problems other than humidity during the months; have plenty o ventilation windows etc.

We aer thinking of a cut pile carpet, with a 50oz pad that breathes; at least thats what my local carpet retialer recommends.

You ok with that? What other optiosn might we consider?

thanks once again, keep up the great work

Carpetguru said...

My answeres got a little out of order here.

To the person with the Masland carpet, you should use a fiber pad. See if you can find a 12 ft wide pad with a rubber-like coating. This will help keep the rug in place.

To the person with the carpet in the basement. You will have some problems taking up the old rubber backed carpet. Once the floor has been cleaned properly, you can use an firm pad that is not over 7/16th inch thick. The 50 ouuce pad is great if it is a fiber pad.

Good luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

I AM MAKING OVER MY GARAGE INTO A PLAYROOM FOR MY 5 YEAR OLD AND 1 YEAR OLD...WHAT SHOULD I USE TO GIVE THEM A COMFORTABLE PADDED PLACE TO PLAY?

Carpetguru said...

If the children are going to play with things like lego etc. I would suggest a soft nylon berber or random sheared pattern installed over 120 ounce slab rubber or Healtheir Choice froth foam green.

Good Luck

Jim

Dennis Fellingham said...

Hello Jim,
My original enquiry was for "Powdery nylon carpet" - by this I meant it is disintergrating, when you rub your hand over the carpet it coming of like a powder on your hand . I live in coastal subtropical Queensland - Australia and my 4 year old nylon carpet has gone powdery in 2 of 4 rooms.These rooms do not have direct sunlight coming into them, but they are very bright and hot - we also have fairly high humidity here.The other 2 rooms seem OK, they are on a shady sides of the house.
What can be causing the problem and what type of carpet should I replace it with ?
Hope you can help.
Regards - Dennis

Carpetguru said...

Dennis,
That is one thing I have not ever seen in over 40 years of working in the carpet business. The carpet could be breaking down due to the heat and sun, but this is not a happening I have seen in the US. Maybe that Queensland sun has even stronger rays than here in North America.

If you ever figure out what is happening, I would like to know.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Hi,

I understand (now) what the difference between face weight and total weight are. But what is a relatively decent face weight for a nylon carpet. Or alternatively is there a ration between face weight and total weight that I should consider?

thanks
lynn

Carpetguru said...

Lynn,

I am glad you read our website. The face weight for a nylon carpet is one of the factors in determining just how well the carpet will perform. Another most important factor is the construction of the carpet. For example, a 20 ounce nylon kitchen type carpet that constructed in commercial loop fashion, will last twenty years in a kitchen. That same 20 ounces in a loose or no twist plush will only look good for a year or less if used in a kitchen.

Thus, look for a tight twist to the fiber, or a super dense construction (the fibers are super close together) if you want performance. A 35 to 40 ounce frieze will last a very long time in most homes; just make sure you are looking at a real frieze, not just a short shag.

Hope this helps,

Jim

Anonymous said...

Hello again! You have been such a help, I thought I might ask one more question. We are installing tile around our bar in the basement we just finished, as well as tile around the door to the outside. In both cases the tile will come into contact with the carpet once it is laid. Is a schluter strip necessary? My carpet man did not seem to think so, but two of the tile people we have gotten estimates from say we need it. What do you do when you install carpet against tile? Thanks. Diane

Carpetguru said...

Diane,

When finishing carpet to ceramic tile on a cement floor, one has to make sure the tile height is no more than 3/8 inch higher than the floor. If the tile is taller, then some sort of reducer strip may be necessary. Depending on the type of carpet, most carpet can be set to the tile using tack strip.

In commercial installations one sometimes will use a special strip made from rubber to "T" the joint between the carpet and the tile. This is not common in residential use, as home traffic does not warrant such extreme measures.

Good Luck,
Jim

Elaine said...

Jim,
We have radiant heat in our basement. I am trying to research the carpet padding needed to achieve the lowest R value. It looks like a slab rubber cushion about 3/8" is the answer. Am I on track? Also, it doesn't seem like I have this choice from most carpet dealers. Can I buy it online and have it shipped? Also, approximately, how much does it go for? ...or do you have other suggestions all together????

Thanks,
Elaine

Carpetguru said...

Elaine,

It is not ONLY R value that you need to consider. You also must make sure the pad you choose will work with your carpet selection. Slab rubber pad will work, but an even better pad would be froth foam as discussed at www.carpetguru.com/froth.html .

You may have to look around to find either type of pad. You will find an 800 number at the web address above to locate the froth foam pad.

Good Luck,

Jim

Anonymous said...

Jim, I am looking for a carpet to replace a poorly performing berber I bought only 5 years ago. I want a plush and am confused about the differences between nylon and PET polyester. I have a lot of heavy traffic areas. I'm looking at Mohawk Home Run Everstrand PET. It is very dense. Do you think it would hold up as well in the traffic areas as a nylon carpet? Dana

Carpetguru said...

Dana,

A dense plush carpet will perform, however, if you install a light color, general soiling (regardless of fiber) will make the carpet look worn. If you purchase a dark color, you will like this style of carpet for a long time.

I think Mohawk has recently discontinued the "home run" carpet, but your dealer may have purchased some "close outs". If the color is not some netural beige, then go for it.

If you are going to install a light color, you are going to have to clean the carpet more often. If this is the case, look for a nylon plush like Shaw's "Wood River" or Hollytex's "willow brook". You will only find these names with dealers who do NOT private label their samples.

Good Luck,
Jim

Robo-Pirate said...

Hi. I have a band, and we just got a new rehearsal space. On the other side of the sheetrock wall is another band, who is much louder than we are. We were thinking of using some inexpensive carpet and pad on the wall to hopefully muffle them a little; do you have any suggestions?

Carpetguru said...

You can find some used carpet (that would be the cheapest), and attach it to the ceiling at the top of the wall you wish to deaden. Leave a six inch air space between the wall and the back of the carpet. Attach the bottom of the carpet to the floor the same distance from the wall as the point on the ceiling. In the space you have created, place crumbled newspaper. It will probably take a weeks worth of newspapers to fill the space.

Now you have made your own sound- deadening wall. When you lease is up, just detach the carpet from the ceiling and the floor, clean up the newspapers, paint the wall, and go market your hit record.

Good luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Hi there,
What do you think of the quality overall of Gulistan carpet. Does that company have a good reputation? Thanks!
Tiffany

Carpetguru said...

Tiffany,

Gulistan is making some of the best carpet out there these days. They especially have great quality control on their backings and latexes used in making the carpet. Check out their friezes made of solution dyed nylon. They are super.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

First, I want to thank you for all of your information, it has opened my eyes! We're carpeting our basement and have decided on nylon berber for its durability. I have a question about how to measure density. I really like a solution dyed nylon by Coronet, it has a twist of only 3.0, but a density of 4,629. What is this density measurement and how does it score for durability? By the way, the face weight is 45 oz.

Carpetguru said...

Density is a function of the relationship between pile weight, pile height, and stich rate (gauge).
The Coronet carpet you are looking at is of sufficient density as to really perform in your basement area. The fact that it is solution dyed is a bonus. Be advised that Coronet does not use solution dyed nylon in their cheap carpets.

You have chosen wisely,

Good Luck,
Jim

Carpetguru said...

To the person who was offered 6 lb or 8 lb pad, use an 8 lb if the thckness is really 7/16th.

good luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

I am doing a Science Fair project and I can't find anything on what machines make carpet? and How is carpet made? I have looked for hours I was wondering if you knew.

Carpetguru said...

You should be able to find the information you need at your local library. There are several books on the history of carpet making.

Most of today's carpets are made on a tufting machine. This machine is made up of hundreds of needles that punch or tuft the fiber through a backing material . During one of the strokes of the needle a knife blade cuts off the fiber at a computer determined length. The backing with the newly tufted fiber is rolled up as it comes off the machine. This is just one phase of the process. To learn more, visit your local library. Not everything in on the internet.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Dear Guru do you know anything about Horshoe Falls Natural honey colour carpet?

It took 2 rolls of Horshoe Falls Natural honey colour carpet to fit my house. Both rolls when fitted together were different in shade and hue despite being I am informed from the same dyelot. Can this be right and is this usual?

Anonymous said...

Hi. You have been so helpful so far! Thanks so much. One final question. My installer promised 8 lb padding for the berber carpet going in my basement tomorrow. Now I am told he does not have enough for the job. (He blames me for not bringing it up again sooner. Hmm.) He does not want to reschedule, but I am willing to wait to get better padding. He has 6 lb. rebond or he has slab rubber, but he says it is heavier than the 23 lb. you recommend. I told him I will wait for the 8lb. 7/16th rebond. Should I wait, take the 6 lb. or a heavier slab rubber? THANKS for all of your help. Diane

Carpetguru said...

Even though you have carpet of the same dye lot, you could still have a problem with color match. Often carpets change color slightly from one end of the roll to the other. Thus, if parts of the second roll were used to complete a fill in a room where the first roll was installed, there still could be a color difference.

Also, you could have a sidematch problem. Sidematch is a term used to describe two pieces of carpet seamed on the side of the roll. The color sometimes changes across the roll, and thus, the seam looks like two different colors. This is a mill defect and should be corrected.

Good Luck,
Jim

Carpetguru said...

To the person who can get slab rubber pad instead of rebond. Go for the slab rubber. Its much better.

Good Luck,
Jim

Phyllis in MD said...

Hi Carpet Guru. I love your site. Thanks so much for all this free advice! It has been so helpful to me in shopping for carpet. Anyway...we just finished our basement and are looking for carpet. I've looked all over the area and found the carpet I like the best(a frieze)at one of the big box home improvement stores (hint: they like the color orange a lot there!)I'm a little concerned about buying from them however, since the young folks working there seem a bit confused on things, I'm not sure how experienced the installers will be, and they only offer either 3/8" or 1/2" rebond pads in either a 6 or 8 pound. (The 8 pound also has a vapor barrier on one side. Does this mean it probably isn't a true 8#. Though perhaps it would be beneficial over concrete.) Since you say that the Carpet and Rug Institute recommends no more than 7/16" thick pad, do you think using 1/2" would be a mistake? Your web site didn't really seem to strongly advocate the 7/16" maximum. I would much rather work with a local carpet shop, but can't seem to find this same carpet, even though it is made by Shaw, which everyone else seems to carry. Should I just get the carpet I like with the 1/2" pad at the big box store, or would that be a mistake? Do you hear of "horror" stories from folks buying carpet at these big boxes? Thanks.

sandy said...

More a question than a comment. I am carpeting my basement and the walls to a height of 6 feet. I am wanting to use a light colour but am worried that it will not be suitable for teenagers. Does the colour appear darker when it is installed in the room I have been told it does I just wonder by how much if I am considering a creamish shade?

Carpetguru said...

Phyllis,

I would try to "borrow" the sample from your big box store. Take it to a Shaw dealer in your area. There is a good chance that dealer will carry the exact same carpet under the true Shaw name.

Second, since your Shaw carpet probably has Soft Bac construction, I would try and find a 7/16th six or 8 lb rebond. Forget about the mositure barrrier on the top of the pad; this is a gimmick.

See if you can find some friends that have purchased carpet somewhere elese besides a big box store. Get referrals.

Installation is everything. I would question the probability of getting a craftsman from the big box stores.

Carpetguru said...

Sandy,

I am sorry these questions got a little out of order.
You should count on the carpet appearing LIGHTER in a large piece.

Also, the direction the carpet is laid will make a difference in color. Looking into the nap will give you a darker look, and looking across the nap will make the carpet look lighter.

Hope this helps,
Jim

Anonymous said...

I am having carpet installed in a fully closed in patio, I beleive the carpet is 40 ounce Frieze if that makes sense. Due to the possibility of dampness the store has recommended to use a 1/2" water resistant backed padding. My question is will this type of padding be a good choice for this carpeting and for this location?

Thank you for your advice it is much appreciated.
Ralph

Carpetguru said...

Ralph,

If the area is going to get wet on a regular basis, you should consider indoor outdoor carpet. If the enclosed area makes it a real room with heat and sealed from the weather, then the frieze will work.

If the floor is concrete, the pad your dealer suggestion will work fine.

Good Luck,
Jim

Phyllis in FREEZING MD said...

Thanks, Jim, for answering my question from the Feb. 6th about buying from the big box stores and the carpet pad thickness. I double checked with Shaw, the manufacturer of the carpet I liked, and they said that if I used a pad thicker than 7/16" that the warrenty would be void!! I asked why they didn't talk to the big box about this and his response was "We can't tell them how to run their business!" So I called the Big Box store again about this. They said that they do have a 7/16" in a 6# but not in 8# (that one is 1/2"). I really want at least 8#. They have a 5/16" 8# that they use for Berbers usually. They might let me use that one. Would going with a 5/16" 8# pad over a basement concrete floor, under a short pile textured plush carpet( I think it might not really be a true frieze as I wrote in my previous post)be a mistake? Would a thinner pad be actually even better for not showing wear, or would it not feel quite right?
I may try and see if I can get a local carpet store to find out the true name of this carpet and just order from them, as you suggesteed, however several have already told me that is difficult to do nowadays. Thanks so much for your advice.

Anonymous said...

Hi,
I was wondering what you thought about Eurolon carpets by Kane Carpets?
Thanks,
Shannon

Carpetguru said...

Phyllis,

The 5/16th pad you are thinking about is a full 1/4 inch thinner than you want. I still strongly suggest you find a carpet you like at a smaller dealer. The difference in price will not be significant.

BTW, if you are freezing, your floor is going to be colder over a thinner padding.

Good luck,
Jim

Carpetguru said...

Shannon,

I do not know about any fiber called Eurolon. The fiber has to be nylon, wool, olefin, or some form of polyester. Find out which it is.

Kane does not make carpet as far as I know. They buy carpet, and remarket under their name. Or, Kane carpet could be imported, hence, the name Eurolon. Sounds nice, but tells you nothing.

Good Luck,
Jim

SassySal said...

We will soon replace the living room carpet with a front entrance, long hallway to bedroom and the bath. We are not replacing the 3 bedrooms that connect with the hallway. Our carpet now is a light green - since we are not replacing the bedrooms, we'd like to find a print to match the light green carpet in the bedrooms. Do not want to spend lots of money so what is available in prints?

Carpetguru said...

Sal,

There are more prints available now than in the last ten years. The trend is towards random sheared patterned carpets. These are not prints, but patterns that look like prints.
If you want lots of choices in printed and woven patterned carpets, then find a commercial carpet specialist in your area.

Good Luck,
Jim

Michael said...

Hi - We have an 80 year old 3 flat with oak floors. We would appreciate your advice on helping us choose the best combination of carpeting and padding with the main intent being to help reduce sounds between floors - the main one being traffic/ people walking in floors above.

Do you have installers in the Chicago area?

Thank you

Carpetguru said...

Michael,

Sorry, we are not an "Empire Carpet". We can suggest that you contact neighbors and friends who may have had good experiences with a local dealer or installer.

The best sound proofing is provided by a thick and dense plush installed over a 1/2 inch (yes, I know 7/16th is the standard, but you want quiet) 8 lb rebond pad. The plush must be at least 3/4 inch pile height for best results.

Good Luck,
Jim

Bob said...

Can you recommend a pad that would be of value in protection from pet urinary accidents?

Bob

Carpetguru said...

Bob,

There is no "pet proof" pad, but if you were to use Healtheir Choice's froth foam (www.carpetguru.com/froth.html), this would be about as good as you could get. Stay away from pads that have a moisture barrier on the top of the pad. These just spread the accident over a larger area under the carpet. Look for pads with a moisture barrier on the bottom of the pad.

Good luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Hi,I had lees for living carpet installed roughly 64 sq yards.I bought the carpet from a dealer for 38 dollars a sqaure,and had my own contractor lay it.After a few months my wife and I noticed what looked a seem right down the middle of the carpet,but the carpet was not seemed there.Long story short,Mohawk hired a independant inspector to evaluate it,and he said it was a factory defect.They offered to let me pick out another carpet,but would not pay for install because I didnt have a "certified" installer.Also they wouldnt pay for moving my pool table/diassembling.So if we are able to live with the streak,they are offering $2000.00 cash back,do you think that amount is a fair deal?
Thanks very much

Carpetguru said...

Did you notice that your Lees for Living was not made by Lees, but by Mohawk??
Your installer should have noticed the streak and stopped the install process. For this reason, the dealer could have denied the claim completely. I would be very happy if I could get two thousand dollars for putting this claim to bed. You are lucky the mill and the dealer offered you that. Take the deal.

Good Luck,
Jim

Ann said...

We don't live in Portland but our son and wife do. Thank you for offering this service.

My question concerns choosing a good quality carpet that will wear well on stairs as well as the entire lower level. I had Shaw's LaStrada but the first install was defective (fibers pulled out of the carpet everywhere). The store replaced it but with a lower grade so now they have to replace it again. I would like to have LaStrada but the quality grade chosen by my interior designer. The samples Shaw sends me are the same quality as what I have. So I am steering clear of it.

I have looked at two Tuftex carpets. Sweet Emotion with a 68.3 face weight, 2561 density and 6.04 density for a traffic rating of 3.8. The second is Calionia Dreaming with a 55.6 face weight, 1820 density, 6.84 twist and 4.2 traffic rating. Which is the better choice?

Shaw tells me they are a textured cut pile but California Dreamin appears more more of a frieze to me.

What would be your choice?

Anonymous said...

I read your life story and I commend you for your expertise and knowledge in this business. Being unemployed and waiting for a job, I was thinking of starting a carpet installation or carpet cleaning business on a shoestring. Please tell me which one is a better paying business to own. Do I need a licence from the beginning and what is the minimum tools I need?

Anonymous said...

We are going to be installing a carpet called Puresque exclusive to Home Depot Stores made by Beauliell of America it claims to have a salt based odor barrier in it to prevent it from absorbing household odors one gentlemen that put it in his home claims it works so well he cant even smell his wifes air fresheners we will be installing it over Healthier Choice Green Padding (I have Asthma)What do you know about this Carpet Product if anything? Thank You

Anonymous said...

I wanted to start a carpet installing business. What's the minimum of tools that I need? Can I start w/o licence and insurance?

Carpetguru said...

Sorry you had a problem with your Shaw carpet. At least the dealer is taking care of the defective problem.
Your best bet here is the California Dreaming.

Good Luck,
Jim

Carpetguru said...

To the unemployeed you should consider that each requires a fair amount of training. Carpet installing is the more difficult of the two. Before you decide, you should work in the trade of either cleaning or installation. After some experience, you will be able to answer your own questions.
Good Luck,
Jim

Carpetguru said...

To the person with the "puresque" carpet from HD, the odor protector is known as "magic fresh" on the regular line of carpets from Hollytex, Coronet, or Beaulieu (all the same company). This odor protector does work, however, commercial cleaning will reduce its effectiveness. With alergies, however, you will need to clean the carpet often to keep out mites and dander from animals.
The HC green pad is a good idea.

Good Luck,
Jim

Sarah said...

I have a new house and the carpet has been down about two years this month. My problem is that it smells when it is humid. It permeates every room even closets. It's almost smells like urine. The store sent out a serviceman who took a sample from the leftover scraps. He had it tested and determined it was okay. It's not. What do you suppose is wrong? They suggested I could send it to another independent lab and pay to have it tested.

What's going on with my carpet and would it be worth it to have retested?

Carpetguru said...

Shara,

Your carpet may not be at fault. If there was no odor when the carpet was new, it is doubtful that the carpet suddenly started giving off odor. If the carpet was cleaned using hot water extraction method, it is possible that the cleaner got the carpet and pad too wet. The water will cause the pad to develop mold. You may have to pull the carpet back away from a wall about half way into the room. This will expose the pad. If it is wet, replace it. If it is damp, replace it. Treat the floor with an anti-mold treatment.

This could be just one reason for the odor. You may have to hire a home inspector to discover real source of odor.

Good Luck,
Jim

Amanda said...

Hello Jim

Your website is amazing. I have learned so much.
I have a question though =I have been looking at some of the Hollytex nylon twist/loop carpets in the tweedy mixed colours. However, I can not find anyone who sells the Hollytex carpets in Australia. Do you know if there is? and if noone sells it here, is there another brand and carpet range that is comparable?
thankyou so much
Amanda

Carpetguru said...

Thank you for your kind words, Amanda . You are lucky to be living in a great country that is so close to New Zealand. You have access to some of the
best wool carpets on the planet. You may want to look into that as an option.

If you still want Hollytex, you may find it under the international label Beaulieu. The carpet will be an import, and could be just as expensive as the wools you have available to you.

I hope to visit your country again; I really loved Carins.
Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

I am finshing an upstairs where my children will sleep & play. A while back you recommended 120 oz slab rubber and a thick plush carpet for noise attenuation. The installers in my area look a little confused when I talk about the rubber. It seems all they know is rebond. Can you recommend a manufacturer?
Thanks,
Chris

Carpetguru said...

Chris,

You should be able to find rubber padding from Liggett & Platt or from Foamex Inc. Many stores carry rebond, as it easy to handle, and it feels just as good as most rubber padding. However, the slab rubber is much denser, and therefore will deaden sounds better.

Hope this hopes,

Jim

Anonymous said...

What a wonderful site! It’s great to “meet” someone who is knowledgeable and passionate about what they do. Until today I was totally clueless about carpeting and now, thanks to you, I’m 90% clueless :-). I read all your comments twice and still hope for your advice.

I am looking to replace about 1600 sq. ft. of carpeting. My main consideration when choosing the optimal carpet is that I have three German "Shedders", so I will need something that vacuums well and is somewhat more resistant to pet stains and especially vomit stains. I would also like to add that I own a Hoover SteamVac which I use probably more often than an average homeowner. Is it good? bad? advisable?

The dealer I’ve contacted is pushing Resista from Millcraft, 100% polyester, style 7W082 Congo (that’s all the info I can find on the sample). I believe it’s a frieze, or a short shag. What would you recommend, including a pad? Eagerly awaiting your advice.

Thank you,
Renee

Carpetguru said...

Renee,

You are the perfect candidate for the new SmartStrand PTT fiber from Mohawk or Aladdin Mills. This fiber is stronger than PET polyester, and even more color fast. Look for one of these products in a short pile, and in a darker color. Pet Vomit will not bleach out the color. Use your Hoover Carpet Cleaner only in between professional cleanings. Try not to use too much soap.

The next step up from the SmartStrand, and more expensive, would be a continuous filament solution dyed nylon pile. These are available from Hollytex Mills.

Good Luck in your shopping,

Jim

Ann said...

This is to followup my entry I wrote last week about a urine-smelling odor in my carpet. I guess I wasn't clear in my description but the carpet has smelled ever since it was installed however, only in humid weather. This is a newly constructed house so the pad and carpet went down at the same time.

Carpetguru said...

Ann,

New carpet and pad should stop smelling after 48 hours if the area is well ventilated. However, other things in the new house could be causing the smell besides the carpet.
If you still have odor problems you need to have the carpet inspected by a certified master carpet inspector. These people are listed in the Yellow pages under carpet cleaners.

Good Luck,
Jim

Maria said...

Hi,

I am about to have a carpet company come out and measure my home for carpet. The carpet that I have chosen, at this point, is Beaulieu-Coronet-Snazzy. I am told by the dealer that this is a fieze style carpet and that it is 35oz. PET Polyester/nylon blend, the backing is Clos Pic Action Back. My living room is a high traffic area for family and my black lab, it also gets a lot of sunlight and humidity here in the Florida Panhandle. I have a set of stairs and an office, my furniture is heavy and hard to put on casters, roll top desk and couches that are lazy boys. The carpet comes with 6lb padding. Is the carpet a good choice for such a room and is the padding adequate in your opinion?

Carpetguru said...

Maria,

If you are going to be in the home less than seven years, then the carpet you have selected will work.
However, if you want long term performance, and you have a bigger budjet, I would suggest another Beaulieu carpet from their Hollytex division called
Supreme Elegance. This is a solutin dyed NYLON frieze that will look good on the stairs even after
ten or more years of hard use. Also, I would like to see you install over an 8 lb pad if possible.

As a bonus, supreme elegence will not fade, and you can be more agressive when cleaning up those doggy accidents.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

CarpetGuru,
You are a lifesaver! This is a phenomenal blog of information. Someone already measured my house for carpeting, so I'm going to measure myself tonight! I'm just starting the process of buying carpet and you've saved "ignorant little 'ol me" a lot of anxiety over buying carpet.
THANKS!
Colorado Homeowner

Anonymous said...

Is the 120 oz rubber too dense to install over stairs w/overhanging treads? What is the prefered carpet type for the long term?
Thanks again,
Chris

Carpetguru said...

Colorado Homeowner,

Thank you for your kind words,

Jim

Carpetguru said...

The person using 120 ounce slab rubber on stairs
has choosen wisely. You can use a commercial
carpet on the stairs for the longest lasting results, but if you don't want commercial looped carpet all over your home, try a short dense frieze or velvet plush.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Carpet Guru,
The info on your site is very helpfyl to consumers. My question is, I want to replace a carpet only 3 years old due to color. The rebond carpet pad is also (only 3 years old) and I want to use existing pad but would like to glue an extra layer of rebond pad to add height and thicknes to existing pad prior to installing new carpet. Is this possible?
Thanks,
Patti

Carpetguru said...

Patti,


The idea of adding a layer of padding to an existing pad may sound good, but, in reality, it’s a bad move. If you increase the thickness beyond 7/16th you increase the risk of delamination of the carpet. (that is where the two backings come apart).

If your existing pad is only 3/8 thick, then take it up and replace with a new pad absolutely no thicker than 1/2 inch.

Good luck,

Jim

Julie said...

Thank you for a wonderful and helpful site! We are researching carpet for our new house. We saw some carpet by Camelot that we liked. What is your opinion on their carpet?

Thanks!

Carpetguru said...

Julie,

You have chosen wisely. Camelot is a high end quality mill. They make most of their carpet from high quality nylon. You will like owning their carpet.

Good Luck,
Jim

Amanda said...

Hello again Carpetguru, it is Amanda from Australia again. Thankyou for your comments on finding Hollytex carpets.
In my search for frothed foam and solution dyed nylon dense loop carpet I have a few more questions I am hoping you could answer.

1. No-one at either of the 2 carpet shops in my town know what frothed foam is. Do you have a contact in Australia who sells it so I can get my carpet shop to contact them so they can see about ordering it for me?

2. Wool carpet does seem to be relatively cheaper here than solution dyed nylon. I am worried about stains though. In particular the tea and coffee variety which we have many of on our very expensive previous wool carpet. Is it possible to get slution dyed wool carpet? The carpet shops here tell me no but wanted to check.

3. What is your opinion on the mixed fibre carpets such as wool and nylon mix?
Does it give the best of both worlds or the worst of two worlds?

4. What is your opinion on the semi loop carpets which
are patterned (nopt in a print I mean in the way the fibre is looped or cut). Will they be less hard wearing than a regular loop carpet? or would it depend more on the length of the loop? eg a short patterned loop more durable than a longer regular loop?

5. One of my local carpet shops has only two carpets that are solution dyed nylon. He does however have a huge range of non-solution dyed nylons which are stainmaster. He tells me that the stain master is as durable as the solution dyed. I had a feeling this is not true but just wanting to check.

thankyou so much again for your website and apologies for the plethora of questions.
Amanda

Carpetguru said...

Amanda,

Good to hear from you again. I think that you will not be able to find any froth foam in your country.

Solution dyed means the fiber was dyed while it was a chemical, and since wool in not a chemical, wool is not a solution dyed fiber.

Stainmaster is a topical stain treatment, and is not the same as solution dyed. If you cannot find a solution dyed nylon that you love, then I would still pick a nylon (not a blend of wool and nylon) over wool if you are really concerned about stains. It is as durable as any nylon, including solution dyed nylon.

Pattern carpets that you mention will perform very well, however, it takes a talented "fitter" (carpet layer) to make good looking seams in those products.

If the carpet you end up purchasing is tufted, then a nice slab rubber pad will do nicely. If it is a woven product, then a commercial hair and jute of at least 40 ounces will work best.

Hope this helps,
Jim

steven said...

Jim,

How sensitive is pergo laminate to moisture. Can I ruin it by walking barefoot across it after taking a shower? It's supposed to be water resistant.

Carpetguru said...

I never suggest one install a "pergo" type floor in a bathroom. Moisture and any type of wood do not mix. After six months of "showers", your laminate floor will be cupped and showing signs of coming apart. Try a nice wood-looking piece of sheet vinyl.

Good luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

I just purchased the HOLLYTEX ULTIMATE PERFORMACE, Supreme elegance from you this week for our upstairs and we are eagerly looking forward to having it installed. I wanted to know however; who in the Portland area do you recommend for cleaning and how do you rate them in terms of service, price, and ability?

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the helpful information on density, face weight, & twist. I'm still having trouble determining the density difference between Hollytex: Love Affair & Supreme Elegance. Any additional tips I can try? Is a density rating listed with the product information? Thank you.

Carpetguru said...

Density is not only a function of stitch rate, but also takes into account pile heigth and pile weight.
You need the pile weight of each to compare, but I favor Supreme elegance for its solution dyed nylon, and its good twist rate.

Good Luck,
Jim

Carpetguru said...

For the person who was looking for a good
carpet cleaner in our area, I would suggest
Classic Carpet and Upholstery Cleaners, or The Carpet Sergeon. Both are good, and honest.

Good luck,
Jim

harvey said...

do you have any expierence wit bamboo floors delaminating?
harvey simon

Carpetguru said...

Harvey,

The few problems we have had with delamination of wood floors in general can be traced back to moisture problems. Bamboo is not moisture proof, and any excess moisture will can cause the glues holding the floor together to fail. The result is not pretty.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

I am looking for a difference between tactesse and smartstrand. do you have any more of an opinion since the end of 06. to do a basement do you think tactesse is worth $400-500 more than smartstrand.

Carpetguru said...

Tactesse and SmartStrand are both very soft to the touch. Smartstrand is more stain resistant, while Tactess is little stronger. If the pile weights are the same, and the twist level are the same, then I would only choose the Tactess if you are going to be in the home for more than ten years.

Good Luck,
Jim

Juli said...

Dave you are the MAN!

I LOVE THIS SITE!! Thanks for offering this wonderful service to those of us who need a "carpeting for dummies" course.

I did read your website, and have learned much about the correct type of padding to use under a berber carpet. However, I'm now wondering if berber is the right selection for my room. Here's the deal....I have 4 kids and a basement gameroom I'd like to carpet. At some point, we'd like to add a pool table. So between kids and the traffic around a pool table, I'd like something very durable. I wanted a frieze, but was told that it would not hold up under the traffic around a pool table. So I've been considering a Shaw berber in olefin. It's relatively low loop, but does have multiple heights to generate a subtle pattern. Its density is about 6000, and has a wear value of 4.5. And of course, it's color is perfect.

What is your opinion on the better option for a basement application over cement for 4 kids and a pool table:

Berber over a fiber or HC pad

Frieze (what kind of pad?)

or skip olefin and look for a nylon fiber

Thanks in advance for your help.
Juli

Carpetguru said...

Juli,

I would look for a patterned or tweeded commercial carpet made from nylon (a solution dyed nylon if
you can find it) Install over healthier choice blue, or a 40 ounce fiber pad if you cannot find the HC
blue. Stay away from olefins that have a high low pattern of any kind.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Hi Jim. Have you ever heard of National Floors Direct? They want to install their better berber rugOlefin--polypropylene with a 6 pound rebond polyurethane pad rather than an 8lb pad. The rug is going in our living room with high traffic. What do you think. Thanks, Stan

Carpetguru said...

Stan,

Make sure the olefin carpet you are looking at is at least a two ply loop, and is dense. Olefin can crush easily if not constructed well. Also, it is a good idea to install any looped carpet over and 8 lb pad if possible. I like froth foam in a 5/16th thickness best, but only for those people who will be staying in their home more than ten years.

Good Luck,
jim

Andy Stanford said...

Jim, I want to thank you for your website pages. I have sent several customers to the site for information, and corraboration with my advice.
I am a flooring installer with over 26 years installation experience, and it seems many carpet stores, and most customers are in the dark about what it takes to achieve an acceptable installation. Thanks for bringing some light to this poorly illuminated area of the flooring business.

Andy Stanford, Cincinnati, Oh.

Carpetguru said...

Thank you for your kind words, Andy.

Good luck to you,

Jim

Anonymous said...

Dear Mr Carpet Guru:
I was doing some web surfing and bumped in to your site. I would be so grateful if you can comment on the following:
My wife (70) has health problems and has fallen frequently in our tiled bathrooms. Not knowing anything about carpeting, I went to Lowes, explained my situation to the salesman and he suggested I get carpeting and a pad underneath. I took his suggestion and purchased carpeting and padding for our two tiled bathrooms. He also recommended a professional carpet installer who worked for many years at Home Depot.
The installer said he will not put padding between the carpeting and the tile as my wife will have more problems. I told him you are the professional and he will be out in a few weeks.
In the meantime my wife and I are confused as we really want the padding to avoid any further injury.
Is the installer correct in not wanting to put padding between carpeting and tile floor?
Leonard - Boynton Beach, FL

Carpetguru said...

Leonard,

There may be a few reasons the installer did not want to install pad in this situation.
1. The pad would raise the height of the finished bath floor between the bedroom and bath creating a "trip" .

2. The carpet you have selected has it own rubber back and does not need another pad.

3. The installer does not want to go to the extra labor of glueing the tack-strip in place, and having to come back another day after the glue dries to intall the pad and carpet. He will not be able to nail the tackstrip through the tile.

4. The baseboard or tile that makes up the perimeter of the room may have a sharp curve where it meets the tile floor. This would make it impossible for the installer to tuck the edge of the carpet between the tackstrip and the wall.

Check out your room carefully and see if the answer is number three.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Can you tell me the best pad for a basemetn with high misture un the slab.
Larry

Carpetguru said...

Larry,

This is one case where you don't want a pad with a
moisture barrier. You want the pad to breathe. This will allow moisture to escape from the slab.
I would use a 7/16th thick 7 or 8 lb rebond.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Thanks for making this excellent web site.

We want to replace some short nylon loop carpet that came with our current house. Besides looking at traditional/similar carpet, I have been searching for carpet similar to some we bought for another house in 1969. It may have been "kitchen" or "in/outdoor"; it had about a 1/4" integrated black rubber or foam-type backing. This backing did have tiny air cells but seemed very dense and was uniform. The carpet construction was loop, but the loops were seemingly taller and thicker than similar carpet I have found in shopping today. At least each loop was thicker - I guess the 1969 carpet would be called less "dense" because the individual loops were so thick. We used the carpet in bedrooms and living areas. It was very comfortable and durable - no wear, furniture impressions, etc. I don't have any now to try to replicate it. The similar carpet in stores today seems to have thinner backing and doesn't have the (relatively) thick/tall loops, and thus doesn't seem as suitable for living area use. Also the new carpet colors seem to be made of more different color "flecks" - the old carpet seemed to be made of just two colors, but both were bright, just lighter and darker shades of the same color.

This carpet was used over a plywood floor - now we have a slab foundation. If I could find this type carpet can it be used on concrete? If so, where should I look for the product and what should I ask for?

Thanks very much.

Paul

Carpetguru said...

Paul,

See if you can find a carpet with a "kanga" backing.This is a dense foam that is attached to those looped carpets you mention. Not every dealer will have this product.

More and more products are entering the market everyday that are getting closer to the design you seek. Many new pattern carpets are available now, but they are not made with a fat or airfilled loop construction. These are much denser, and much longer lasting.

Good Luck,
Jm

Anonymous said...

I'm looking at a carpet that I can't find any information on and I'm hoping you can help: The carpet is called RESISTA by MILLCRAFT. The name is ZENGER II. Any information you can provide would be greatly appreciated, thanks, Steve.

Carpetguru said...

Steve,

There is no way I can give you information on this carpet, as it is not part of the main stream. This is a private lable name, and the only way I can identify it is to have a sample in my hand.

BTW, be more concerned about the pile make up, the twist level, and the density of the carpet. If you can provide this information, I may be able to advise you.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Dear CarpetGuru!

You are right, so far I liked my local dealer the most. I have been trying to make comparison shopping but it's so hard because noone carries exact the same carpet.

We are looking to install plush carpet in living room, den, stairs, hallway, three bedrooms, and big walking closet.

One of the estimate guys from Empire Today (they don't have a showroom)came to my house and said that they need 1469 sq. ft /121 sq yd. He quoted me their best price of $4000, had me sign ( it was this day price only, what a joke!) . Then I found out it was wear-dated nylon from Mohawk, face 32 oz, and very low density 2100 carpet. Pad was 7/16" 6 lb rebond. I knew I could cancel in 3 days, and I did.

The local dealer gave me SoftPac Shaw Brocton I ( nylon, R2X, 51.7 oz face, 3649 density, 5.1 twist ) with 120 oz slab rubber for $4000. I liked the place, but when I asked the salesman what kind of nylon is that ( there was no fiber manufacturer on the back of the carpet ), he said it's Wear- dated. According to your website it is Anso , could you verify please?
The salesman also said that he is selling this to me at cost plus 18% mark up that they have to make.

Lowe's prices were more expensive than the local store for the comparable brand names ( Shaw, Mohawk). But Lowe's has some off- brand Dakota SOS carpet (nylon,wear-dated II, 55 oz face, 4400 density, and 4.7 twist) They quoted me $3292 with the regular 7/16" 6 lb rebond pad.

All of the prices above included tax, furniture move, tear - offand haul-away of the old carpet.

Do you have any opinion on the Shaw carpet from the local store vs off brand Dakota from Lowes?

Regards,

G.T.

Anonymous said...

I just found out that although the invoice on my new carpet says Shaw and the sample said Shaw, the carpet is actually something called Dixie Group. When I called the store, they were like "no big deal". I think it is a big deal since I've never heard of the Dixie group and feel like i've been taken advantage of.

Carpetguru said...

GT,

You have already saved money by visiting your local dealer. You local dealer may have an old sample of Shaw's SoftBac carpet with a wear dated label on it, however, the carpet you will get will be Anso nylon. This will be the new recyclable N6 anso nylon that can be taken from your home at the end of its life cycle and made in to new carpet. This is part of Shaw's big push to be "green".

The specs you provided indicated that you will most likely not wear out the Shaw plush any time soon. Slab rubber pad is far superior to your 6 lb rebond, and you are really going to enjoy your new plush carpet over this outstanding pad.

Also, I would guess that the installation crew of your local dealer is much more experienced than those contracted by the two mass merchandisers you mentioned.

You have choosen wisely,

Good Luck,
Jim

Carpetguru said...

To the person who received the Dixie carpet instead of the Shaw carpet he ordered,

It is a big deal. You are a victim of fraud at the very least. When your invoice and your sample both state that you are buying a Shaw carpet , and you receive a Dixie Group carpet, you did not get what you ordered. Did the carpet you got look at all like the sample?????.

You have no way of knowing if the carpet you received is of the same quality as what you thought you were getting.

I'd be contacting the store owner, and I would insist that you get the carpet your ordered, or your money back. Dixie group makes some good carept, but you don't know if it is AS GOOD as the carpet you were shown at the time of sale.

Good Luck,
JIm

Anonymous said...

I would like to know if there is somewhere you can still get the old kitchen carpet? PJ

Carpetguru said...

PJ,

Due to lack of demand, the major mills are not making rubber backed printed carpet any more. They are making commercial carpet, in tile form, that can be used in your kitchen.

The one specialty mill that is making rubber backed printed carpet that I know is found at www.joycarpet.com .

Good luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Jim, thank you for answering my previous question.

We have decided to go more "maintream" for the moment and have gotten several estimates for carpet for our house. All are from local dealers except one from Carpet One.

Most local dealers suggested Shaw soft-back nylon called "Textured Creations". One suggested Shaw soft-back polyester, a Kathy Ireland labelled product. The Shaw rating was 5* for both, and the wear rating was either 4.0 for both (if you go by the bar and ^ symobol) or 4.0 for the nylon and 4.25 for the polyester. The nylon seems to cost more yet not be "rated" as high (or at least not higher.) I tried to ask Shaw basically which is "better" but they just quoted specs. The carpet is for the whole house including under the table where we eat (ugliest area at the moment!) - basically everywhere except the kitchen.

Incidentally the Carpet One / Lees estimate is similar to the others in $ but the carpet is not soft back, it's sort of in between soft and the usual super-course back. Frankly the Lees carpet feels "better" as in more dense, but my wife thinks it would be less comforable for that reason.

Thanks very much (again)!

Paul

Carpetguru said...

Paul,

Although Shaw's attempts to make shopping easier by introducing their "par" rating system of 1 thru 5, I look at that whole process as being a kin to 'Olympic Ice Skate Judging". One very inexpensive carpet could have a higher par rating than an expensive carpet due to the fact that the cheaper carpet my be multicolored or tweeded so as to hide traffic an soil. Thus, at the end of the testing, that particular sample may still look newer than that expensive solid colored carpet that would show soil at the end of the test.

That whole rating thing is a judgment call, and I want you to closely examine the twist levels and the density of the carpet instead of relying on a "par" number. Use such ratings as a guide; not gospel.

It appears as if you are on the right track, and just remember to install over a good pad.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

We just had wool carpeting installed and now I find your website! I have concerns about ripples and looseness in the carpeting. Is it true that the installer has to be certified to install wool carpet? Please advise.

Carpetguru said...

It would be my quess that your installer was not
certified. Certified installers know that carpet must be installed with a power stretcher; not just
kicked in with a knee-kicker.

There are many quality installers out there that may not be certified, but still have the skills to install your carpet correctly.

Have your dealer send a DIFFERENT installer out to your home to correct the poor installtion of the original installer.

Good Luck,
JIm

Anonymous said...

Hi Jim, thanks for the info.

I'm a bit confused about your (and others) comments about fiber type and I would appreciate clarification.

You say that nylon should be chosen over any other fiber, but then say that PET polyester "has natural and permanent stain resistance... and compares with nylon in strength and abrasion resistance." I've noticed that many PET carpets seem to give you a greater bang for your buck - so what are the drawbacks?

Also within the nylon category, other than seperating the "soft" nylons and Antron out as being better you imply that there is no difference between a branded nylon and the unbranded. Doesn't stainmaster offer it's own warranty as well as that of the carpet itself? It also seems like the high quality carpets are always made out of a branded rather than non-branded nylons.

I understand that BCF fibers are better but how can I tell if that is what is being used? When I've looked at different styles BCF is only mentioned sometimes with nylon and I have noticed on PET polyester samples. Should I assume that all 6,6 nylon styles or branded nylons will use BCF?

I have more questions but I will just leave you with this short story instead of a novel for now.

Thanks

Carpetguru said...

When selecting your perfect carpet, fiber is just one of the components. To help make your choice you have to set preferences. If wear is most important, combined with cheaper price, then nylon is the only fiber to consider. If cleanability is most important, then PET is a good choice. If appearance i.e. luxury plush, or patterned Berber in that perfect color is most important, then PET or nylon will work.

BCF is an acronym for "bulk continuous filament" and is a label applied to any man made fiber that is not made in staple form. Staple fibers are short lengths of fiber. These pieces are twisted together (like grandma's spinning wheel), to create a spool of yarn. This type is fiber is most often used in making quality plush carpets. Filament fibers are most often used in Berbers, random sheared carpets, and friezes (shags).

To tell if the carpet you are looking at is staple or filament, rub the edge of your credit card over the surface of the sample. If you see any loose fuzz come off the sample, then it is staple fiber. Remember, wool, is a staple fiber, and is used is some of our best carpets. So don't decide on a carpet just because it is made from a filament fiber.

If Mohawk is right, their new SmartStrand may be the perfect fiber for you. I have not heard anything bad about this fiber yet.

Good Luck,
Jim

shelley said...

I have a 60" round 1" shag area rug from Lowes that the tag reads 100 percent olefin. it is light beige and i want a new color. is it possible to dye it to eggplant or amethyst? if so, how? Would it be cheaper to just buy another rug? thanks

Shelley

Carpetguru said...

Shelly,

Olefin is the one fiber that your will not be able to dye.

Start looking for a new rug.

Good luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Hello,
I was wondering if there were any websites that sell froth foam, or slab rubber padding? I have come across a couple that sell the rubber but one is backorder, the other isnt the exact size of rubber you rec.(its 21 lb. dopesnt say oz?) Going around locally all I have found is cheap rebond and a poor selection of it at that.

Also, my friends dad owns a carpet cleaning business and recommended me basically to a junk-type store for the carpet. He said thats where leftover scrap from construction jobs etc. goes. I'm only carpeting one room which I wont even be staying in for more than a year, if that so I want something decent but it doesnt have to be great. Anyways there are no details on the carpets other than size at the store.....so, the carpet I like is the most expensive they sell, you have to buy it in their precut rolls at $8 sq./yd its called "super plush" it looks like it has good twist but other than that I have not a clue how good it is because none of the carpeting is detailed and I've never bought carpet before. It feels EXTREMELY soft, just wondering if theres anything wrong with this type of super plush carpet in general?

Thanks

Carpetguru said...

You will have just as much luck looking for an online pad retailer searching through googel.

Anytime you purchase a thick soft plush you will have to live with footprints, vacuum marks, furniture indentations, and poor cleanability.

If these things are not important to you, and you want to save a buck, then go for it.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

I'd like to find Healthier Choice frothed foam carpet pads in my area, if possible. I'm in area code 94703. Thanks very much.

Carpetguru said...

You can find an 800 number at www.carpetguru.com/froth.html. Be sure to tell them the carpetguru sent you.

Good Luck,
Jim

Anonymous said...

Hi Carpet Guru,

Thanks for your excellent advice.

I have a quick question -- we're thinking about buying a Mohawk "short" frieze from a local dealer, 38 ounces, density 2.307, loop 6.5 X 6.5, Nylon with Scotchguard.

We will use the carpet for stairs, a play area, and 4 bedrooms. We have two kids and no pets.

What do you think about this carpet, in terms of wear and tear? In terms of cleaning stains?

Also, which pad do you recommend? They are offering rebound, 6 lb. or 8lb., 3/8 inch or 1/2 inch.

Thanks again carpet guru. Move to Houston!

SH

Carpetguru said...

SH,

Your carpet selection should serve you well. I would ask to see the "1/2" in pad. I bet if you measure it, it will be 7/16th. This is the perfect thickness. A quality pad is important, 8 lb density is a good choice.

Good luck,

Jim

Anonymous said...

Dear Carpet Guru,

I love your column.

I read the earlier response about pad thickness, and now I am confused. Installers here are offering a 1/2 inch pad, saying that the only one who offers the 7/16 inch pad is Orange Giant. Furthermore, my carpet warranty is valid only if installed on a pad "no thicker than 1/2 inch." Is the 1/16 of an inch really a big deal, between 7/16 and 1/2? Will installing a 1/2 inch carpet pad make the carpet look unsightly over time?

Thanks in advance for taking the time to respond,
Diana

Carol Ann said...

Dear CG,
I've not seen anything identical to my concerns in the blog so here is my situation.

We are installing a good quality nylon plush carpet by Shaw on a cement slab in an apartment we've built for our aging mother. We've chosen a half inch "Plushstep Ultra" pad that includes a moisture barrier and antimicrobial treatment. We wanted to provide an environment that was warm, (we live in the north central US), and safe, as she has fallen in the past. We are carpeting the whole apartment, including the bathroom. We were advised by our salesperson that this would be acceptable, but he suggested that we seal the cement prior to the installation. Now I've found information on various websites that we should be more concerned about the carpet breathing and that the pad may not be the best choice. We received a call today that our carpet has come in and we need to schedule an appointment for installation. We have not yet sealed the cement and I'm wondering what your recommendation would be. The apartment is well-elevated and has never had a water problem. The slab is two years old so it is certainly cured. We purchased a product called "Concrete and Masonry Waterproofer" by Behr, in anticipation of sealing it.

You are a Prince for sharing so much of your time and expertise. You should write a book! I'm certain it would be a "must-have" for we DIY'ers or most any homeowner. I've already learned much from just browsing your site and the blog. Thank you for any insight and advice you may have for me.

Carpetguru said...

Carol Ann,

Take the sealer back to the store and get your money back. You want the concrete to breathe.

Also, I am not a big fan of pads with a moisture barrier being installed over concrete. Look for a nice 8 lb 6/17th pad.

Good Luck,
Jim

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